Macerating Liqueurs at Home

Recently I have been a bit fixated on the idea of making my own macerated liqueurs at home.  I should probably note that I get fixated on one thing or another fairly easily, with the result being a number of experiments that hopefully lead to a result with which I am happy.  If I am […]

Macerating Liqueurs at Home Read More »

Recently I have been a bit fixated on the idea of making my own macerated liqueurs at home.  I should probably note that I get fixated on one thing or another fairly easily, with the result being a number of experiments that hopefully lead to a result with which I am happy.  If I am

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Food in the News (aka Our National Eating Disorder)

Sometimes it is hard to to get your head around all the important issues concerning food in America.  Lets face it, no one who thinks seriously about how we as a nation produce, transport and consume food can help but be concerned.  GMO’s, massive fish and bird kills, overfishing, tainted spinach, salmonella in chickens, beef

Food in the News (aka Our National Eating Disorder) Read More »

Sometimes it is hard to to get your head around all the important issues concerning food in America.  Lets face it, no one who thinks seriously about how we as a nation produce, transport and consume food can help but be concerned.  GMO’s, massive fish and bird kills, overfishing, tainted spinach, salmonella in chickens, beef

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Foie Gras Terrine for the Holidays

January 06, 2011

It is hard to image the holiday season in France without foie gras. During an October visit to Maison Lafitte Foie Gras in the village of Montaut (note: our friends who live in Montaut would undoubtedly correct me on this point…by the traditional definition, Montaut is a Bourg, not a village, the difference being that a Bourg has a doctor. With a population of only 600 however, feels distinctly like a village) in France’s Chalosse region, General Manager Fabian CHEVALIER told me that his annual production cycle was driven by the sales demands of December, when a majority of the year’s output would be sold. Both for Christmas and New Years, foie gras in all its forms is a must. However, working with foie gras can be a daunting prospect for those who haven’t had the experience. And given the cost of good quality fresh foie gras, mistakes can be expensive. Fortunately, if you follow few simple steps carefully, a great foie gras terrine is really not that complicated.

Each year at Le Pichet, we serve foie gras in terrine as a special for the Holidays. But you might say “foie gras seems too fancy and expensive for Le Pichet” and you would generally be right. However, given the importance of foie gras to the season in France, we make an exception in December.

Foie Gras Terrine for the Holidays Read More »

January 06, 2011

It is hard to image the holiday season in France without foie gras. During an October visit to Maison Lafitte Foie Gras in the village of Montaut (note: our friends who live in Montaut would undoubtedly correct me on this point…by the traditional definition, Montaut is a Bourg, not a village, the difference being that a Bourg has a doctor. With a population of only 600 however, feels distinctly like a village) in France’s Chalosse region, General Manager Fabian CHEVALIER told me that his annual production cycle was driven by the sales demands of December, when a majority of the year’s output would be sold. Both for Christmas and New Years, foie gras in all its forms is a must. However, working with foie gras can be a daunting prospect for those who haven’t had the experience. And given the cost of good quality fresh foie gras, mistakes can be expensive. Fortunately, if you follow few simple steps carefully, a great foie gras terrine is really not that complicated.

Each year at Le Pichet, we serve foie gras in terrine as a special for the Holidays. But you might say “foie gras seems too fancy and expensive for Le Pichet” and you would generally be right. However, given the importance of foie gras to the season in France, we make an exception in December.

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